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  • Samuel at Gilgal

    This year I will be sharing brief excerpts from the articles, sermons, and books I am currently reading. My posts will not follow a regular schedule but will be published as I find well-written thoughts that should be of interest to maturing Christian readers. Whenever possible, I encourage you to go to the source and read the complete work of the author.

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Patriotism

Quoting George Washington’s Farewell Address:

Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity. Religion and morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of Patriotism who should labor to subvert these great Pillars of human happiness—these firmest props of the duties of Men and citizens. (October 19, 1796)

George Washington On Liberty And Happiness

From George Washington’s First Inaugural Address:

[M]y fervent supplications to that Almighty Being who rules over the universe; who presides in the councils of nations; and whose providential aid can supply every human defect; that his benediction may consecrate to the liberties and happiness of the People of the United States, a Government instituted by themselves for these essential purposes, and may enable every instrument employed in its administration to execute with success the functions allotted to his charge. In tendering this homage to the Great Author of every public and private good. (April 30, 1789)

George Washington On The Foundation Of National Policy

 

George Washington

George Washington in his First Inaugural Address on April 30, 1789 said:

The foundations of our national policy will be laid in the pure and immutable principles of private morality, and the preeminence of free government be exemplified by all the attributes which can win the affections of its citizens, and command the respect of the world.

Part VI: George Washington’s Rules of Civility and Decent Behavior

George Washington

At the age sixteen, George Washington wrote out by hand, 110 Rules of Civility. These are based on a set of rules composed by French Jesuits in 1595. The rules have one major interest in common; a focus on other people and not on our own self-interests which is so prevalent today. Some of his ideas may seem quaint to our modern minds but they are an excellent reminder of the importance of being a gentleman!

61 Utter not base and frivolous things among grave and learned men, nor very difficult questions or subjects among the ignorant, or things hard to be believed; stuff not your discourse with sentences among your betters nor equals.

62 Speak not of doleful things in a time of mirth or at the table; speak not of melancholy things or death and wounds, and if others mention them, change if you can the discourse; tell not your dream, but to your intimate.

63 A man ought not to value himself of his achievements or rare qualities [damaged manuscript] virtue or kindred.

64 Break not a jest where none take pleasure in mirth; laugh not alone, nor at all without occasion; deride no man’s misfortune though there seem to be some cause.

65 Speak not injurious words neither in jest nor earnest; scoff at none although they give occasion.

66 Be not forward but friendly and courteous,the first to salute, hear, and answer; and be not pensive when it’s a time to converse.

67 Detract not from others neither be excessive in commanding.

68 Go not thither, where you know not whether you shall be welcome or not; give not advice [without] being asked, and when desired do it briefly.

69 If two contend together take not the part of either unconstrained, and be not obstinate in your own opinion; in things indifferent be of the major side.

70 Reprehend not the imperfections of others, for that belongs to parents, masters, and superiors.

 

George Washington On The Duties Of Religion

George Washington

Quoting George Washington:

“While we are zealously performing the duties of good citizens and soldiers, we certainly ought not to be inattentive to the higher duties of religion. To the distinguished character of Patriot, it should be our highest glory to add the more distinguished character of Christian.” (The Writings of Washington, pp. 342-343)

George Washington On Saving The People From Tyranny

General George Washington

Quoting George Washington:

“We have therefore to resolve to conquer or die: Our own Country’s Honor, all call upon us for a vigorous and manly exertion, and if we now shamefully fail, we shall become infamous to the whole world. Let us therefore rely upon the goodness of the Cause, and the aid of the supreme Being, in whose hands Victory is, to animate and encourage us to great and noble Actions — The Eyes of all our Countrymen are now upon us, and we shall have their blessings, and praises, if happily we are the instruments of saving them from the Tyranny mediated against them.” (George Washington, General Orders, July 2, 1776)

America: Keeping To The Road

George Washington

Quoting George Washington:

“No country upon earth ever had it more in its power to attain these blessings than United America. Wondrously strange, then, and much to be regretted indeed would it be, were we to neglect the means and to depart from the road which Providence has pointed us to so plainly.”

Washington On The Foundation Of National Policy

George Washington

Quoting George Washington:

“(T)he foundation of our national policy will be laid in the pure and immutable principles of private morality; …the propitious smiles of Heaven can never be expected on a nation that disregards the eternal rules of order and right which Heaven itself has ordained…” (First Inaugural, April 30 1789)

George Washington On Virtue

George Washington (2)

George Washington

Quoting George Washington:

[A] good moral character is the first essential in a man, and that the habits contracted at your age are generally indelible, and your conduct here may stamp your character through life. It is therefore highly important that you should endeavor not only to be learned but virtuous. (Maxims of George Washington, Schroeder, ed. 143, Letter to Steptoe Washington)

George Washington On American Citizenship

The earliest authenticated portrait of George ...

George Washington

Quoting George Washington:

Citizens by birth or choice of a common country, that country has a right to concentrate your affections. The name of American, which belongs to you, in your national capacity, must always exalt the just pride of Patriotism, more than any appellation derived from local discriminations. (George Washington: A Collection, W.B. Allen, ed. – 1796 – Farewell Address)

George Washington On America’s Blessings

George Washington

Quoting George Washington:

No country upon earth ever had it more in its power to attain these blessings than United America. Wondrously strange, then, and much to be regretted indeed would it be, were we to neglect the means and to depart from the road which Providence has pointed us to so plainly; I cannot believe it will ever come to pass. (George Washington: A Collection, W.B. Allen, ed. – Letter to Benjamin Lincoln)

The Eyes Of Our Countrymen Are Upon Us

Quoting George Washington:

“Let us therefore rely upon the goodness of the Cause, and the aid of the supreme Being, in whose hands Victory is, to animate and encourage us to great and noble Actions. The Eyes of all our Countrymen are now upon us, and we shall have their blessings, and praises, if happily we are the instruments of saving them from the tyranny mediated against them.”

George Washington On The Conduct Of Americans

George Washington

Quoting George Washington:

“It should be the highest ambition of every American to extend his views beyond himself, and to bear in mind that his conduct will not only affect himself, his country, and his immediate posterity; but that its influence may be co-extensive with the world, and stamp political happiness or misery on ages yet unborn.”

George Washington On Immigration

April 30: George Washington becomes the first ...

George Washington

Quoting George Washington:

“The bosom of America is open to receive not only the Opulent and respectable Stranger, but the oppressed and persecuted of all Nations and Religions; whom we shall welcome to a participation of all our rights and privileges, if by decency and propriety of conduct they appear to merit the enjoyment.”

Restoring Honor To America

From the desk of Marie Jon:

America will not survive the political and social trials that are to come if we are not engaged in the fight to protect our Judeo-Christian beliefs and our American way of life. We do not want to become a socialist country by “forcing Peter to give to Paul.”

Redistribution of wealth is immoral. We will head in the wrong direction by continually pushing our nation into socialism. We must stop it at the ballot box.

There comes a time when people are shoved to the edge of despair, but then the rush of a mighty wind comes out of the ash heap and awakens a spiritual revival. With humbled hearts, a million or more patriotic and God-fearing people are expected to arrive in Washington, D.C., a few steps below the Lincoln Memorial on August 28th, with a pledge of Restoring Honor at a nonpartisan rally led by Glenn Beck.

Continue reading. . . .

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